Pharmacology and Toxicology

Undergraduate Courses

Pharmacology and Toxicology Courses

For Distribution Requirement purposes, all PCL courses are classified as SCIENCE courses (BR=4).

For student course evaluations, please visit the PTSA website

Please consult the Arts & Science Timetable for course schedules.

*Please note: Following the course title, L = Lecture hours, T = Tutorial hours, P = Practical Lab hours
 

course description, Pre-requisites/Co-requisites

PCL102H1

Dr. Rebecca Laposa

The Art of Drug Discovery (24L)

This course introduces students to the processes and strategies for discovering new drugs with a special focus on current and emerging approaches for the rational design of drugs that are both effective and safe.

PCL200H1

Dr. Amy Ramsey

Drugs & The Brain [24L]

Lectures introduce students to prescribed and illicit drugs that affect the brain. Lectures cover drug pharmacology and explain how drugs alter mood, perception, cognition, and arousal by affecting different aspects of brain function. The societal impact of these prescribed and illicit drugs is also discussed

  • Prerequisite: None
  • Exclusion: PSY396H1, PCL302H1, BCH210H1, BCH242Y1

PCL201H1

Dr. Cindy Woodland

Introduction to Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetic Principles (36L, 6T)

A general introduction to Pharmacology. Topics include absorption, distribution, biotransformation, elimination, calculation of dosages, variability in drug response, adverse drug reactions and special interest topics.

  • Prerequisite: BIO130H1
  • Recommended Co-requisites: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, PSL300H1/ PSL301H1

PCL218H1

Dr. Ruth Ross

Cannabis the Drug (24L)

There is a critical need for a breadth of understanding regarding its mechanism of action, pharmacological effects and its potential benefits and harms (short- and long-term). Students will gain a breadth of understanding in cannabis-related topics including pharmacology and toxicology, its role in mental health and addictions, medical use, drug policy and new drug development that stems from increased access to cannabis constituents. They will learn to differentiate myths and anecdotes from evidence-based knowledge. Going forward it is imperative that students spanning basic sciences through business, arts and engineering have a comprehensive understanding of these topics. PCL218H1 will give students for a variety of academic backgrounds a basic understanding of the health implications of cannabis which have broad implications for both our professional and personal lives.

PCL297H1

Dr. Anita Hamadanizadeh

Research Experience in Pharmacology and Toxicology (60P)

A formal opportunity to gain hands-on experience and develop their skills within a research laboratory setting. Students will have a chance to become familiar and efficient at good lab practices, develop critical thinking and evaluation skills while applying their knowledge and developing trouble shooting skills to practical research questions. This course is Pass/Fail. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

  • Prerequisite: None; Permission of Faculty Supervisor and Departmental Undergraduate Coordinator required.
  • Corequisite: None
  • Recommended Preparation: Completion of at least first year of Life Sciences program.

PCL299Y1

Dr. Michelle Arnot

Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

PCL302H1

Dr. Jane Mitchell

Introduction to Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamic Principles (36L)

Topics include biological action of drugs on membranes, enzymes, receptors, neural and hormonal systems, transmission and modulation.

  • Prerequisite: ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
  • Recommended Preparation: PCL201H1

PCL345H1

Dr. Ana Andreazza

Experimental Approaches in Drug Discovery (24L)

Lecturers use their own research to demonstrate how they approach a biological question. The lectures emphasize why one approach is chosen over other possible approaches, and explain the strengths and limitations of techniques. Following the one-hour lecture there is an interactive discussion of the experimental approach covered in the lecture.

  • Prerequisite: One of PSL300H1/ PSL301H1/ BIO270H1/ BIO271H1, and completion of at least 10.0 FCE, or permission of Department
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1, PCL201H1, PCL302H1

PCL362H1

Dr. Peter G. Wells

Introductory Toxicology (26L)

Toxicological problems encountered in animals and humans; biochemical mechanisms and clinical factors of toxicological significance; models of drug-related diseases.

  • Prerequisite: BIO130H1, PCL201H1 or Permission of the Department
  • Corequisite: Recommended Co-requisite: PCL302H1, BCH311H1/ CSB349H1
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1, CHM247H1

PCL366H1 - NOT CURRENTLY OFFERED

Dr. Anita Hamadanizadeh

Basic Pharmacology & Toxicology Laboratory (32P, 16T)

Through practical hands-on laboratory experiments and tutorials, students will be introduced to some basic experimental techniques and laboratory skills that are used within pharmacology and toxicology research. (Ancillary lab fee $25)

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PSL300H1/ PSL301H1
  • Corequisite: PCL302H1
  • Exclusion: PCL365Y1/ PCL471Y1

PCL367H1

Dr. Anita Hamadanizadeh

Drug Development Pipeline I: In vitro (8T, 40P)

This course will provide a learning experience that simulates the process, techniques, analysis and evaluation methods used for early-stage in vitro drug development. Modules will build on the student’s fundamental knowledge and will simulate and illustrate the thought processes and techniques that are used during new drug development in academic research institutes, clinical research organizations and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies worldwide. Modules include target screening, cytotoxicity assays, transcriptional activation testing and metabolizing enzyme identification experiments. This experience will allow students to leverage their learned knowledge to improve their employability in this area, while honing their critical thinking and analytical skills.

  • Prerequisite: PSL300H1, PSL301H1
  • Corequisite: PCL302H1
  • Recommended Preparation: PCL201H1

PCL368H1

Dr. Anita Hamadanizadeh

Drug Development Pipeline II: In vivo (8T, 40P)

 

This course will provide a learning experience that parallels and simulates the process, protocols, methods and evaluation tools used for later-stage in vivo drug development. Modules will build on the student’s fundamental knowledge and simulate the thought processes and techniques used during drug development in research institutes, clinical research organizations and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies worldwide. Modules will include pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses and pharmacogenetic screening approaches in model systems and humans. This experience will allow students to leverage their learned skills and knowledge to improve their comprehension and employability in this area, while honing critical thinking and analytical skills.

  • Prerequisite: PSL300H1, PSL301H1, PCL201H1, PCL302H1

PCL389H1

Dr. Michelle Arnot

Understanding the Role of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Society (24L)

This service learning course explores issues surrounding the effects that pharmaceuticals and chemicals have in society. Specifically, it integrates pharmacology and toxicology with social, health and political issues as they relate to drug abuse and addiction. Students are required to interact and work with community partners during the semester (approx 20hrs). Classroom discussions will integrate community experiences with lecture material.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1
  • Corequisite: PCL302H1; ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)

PCL397Y0

undergrad.pharmtox@utoronto.ca

Research Abroad in Pharmacology and Toxicology (200P)

An independent research project in a pharmacology and/or toxicology laboratory in an approved partner university. This international research experience will be supervised by a faculty member at the partner institution and will allow students to develop critical thinking and evaluation skills while applying their knowledge and trouble shooting skills to practical research questions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1 (65%), PSL300H1 (65%), PSL301H1 (65%); permission from the Undergraduate Coordinator
  • Recommended Preparation: PCL302H1 (65%)
PCL399Y1

Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

PCL402H1

Dr. Rebecca Laposa

Pharmacology and Toxicology in Drug Development (24L)

This course provides the basic principles of drug development, with a primary focus on the application of fundamental principles of pharmacology and toxicology to the design and conduct of early phase clinical trials. This is the phase of the drug development process where much of the innovation and science occurs.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1
  • Corequisite: PCL470H1 or PCL473Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: PSL300H1, PSL301H1

PCL461H1 - NOT CURRENTLY OFFERED

Dr. Anita Hamadanizadeh

Advanced Pharmacology and Toxicology Laboratory (36P, 12T)

Advanced laboratory exercises and discussions through tutorials and presentations in selected areas of pharmacology. Enrollment in this course is generally restricted to students enrolled in the Pharmacology Specialist and Pharmacology and Biomedical Toxicology Specialist programs. (Ancillary lab fee $25).

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PSL300H1/ PSL301H1, PCL366H1
  • Exclusion: PCL365Y1/ PCL471Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: PCL469H1

PCL469H1
(formerly PCL470Y)

Dr. Michelle Arnot

 

Systems Pharmacology I (31L, 4T)

A culmination of pharmacological principles discussing concepts of drug properties and their interactions within the body. The mechanism of action, pharmacological properties including clinical use and adverse effects of drugs acting on the autonomic nervous systems, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems will be examined. Critical evaluation of primary literature and examination of clinical problem-based case studies will be integrated with lecture material through small group sessions.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
  • Exclusion: PCL470Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1

PCL470H1
(formerly PCL470Y1)

Dr. Ali Salahpour

Systems Pharmacology II (31L/4T)

A culmination of pharmacological principles discussing concepts of drug properties and their interactions within the body. The mechanism of action, pharmacological properties including clinical use and adverse effects of drugs acting on the central nervous systems and immunological system; antimicrobial and cancer chemotherapeutic agents as well as the potential therapeutic use of endogenous/herbal compounds will be examined. Critical evaluation of primary literature and examination of clinical problem-based case studies will be integrated with lecture material through small group sessions.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
  • Exclusion: PCL470Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1

PCL472Y1

Dr. Rebecca Laposa

Project in Pharmacology (~200P)

This course affords students an opportunity for hands-on research experience in a laboratory or applied pharmacology setting. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and will submit a final written report and oral presentation. Enrollment is limited and requires permission from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. It is the student’s responsibility to secure a placement with an approved supervisor before the course begins (a list of potential supervisors can be obtained from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology). Students will be registered in the course once their ballot form (obtained from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology) is signed by an approved supervisor and approved by the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. Students are expected to spend approximately 200 hours towards this project but this will be project/supervisor dependent. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL366H1/ PCL367H1/ PCL368H1, STA288H1/ PCL376H1, and permission of Department
  • Exclusion: PCL474Y1

PCL474Y1

Dr. Rebecca Laposa

Project in Toxicology (~200P)

This course affords students an opportunity for hands-on research experience in a laboratory or applied toxicology setting. Students will work under the supervision of a staff member and will submit a final written report and oral presentation. Enrollment is limited and requires permission from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. It is the student’s responsibility to secure a placement with an approved supervisor before the course begins (a list of potential supervisors can be obtained from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology). Students will be registered in the course once their ballot form (obtained from the Department of Pharmacology) is signed by an approved supervisor and approved by the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. Students are expected to spend approximately 200 hours towards this project but this will be project/supervisor dependent. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

  • Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL366H1/ PCL367H1/ PCL368H1, STA288H1/ PCL376H1, and permission of Department
  • Exclusion: PCL472Y1

PCL475H1

Dr. WM Burnham

Neuropsychopharmacology I (36L, 12T)

Students will explore the major CNS neurological syndromes, examples include pain, epilepsy, the sleep-wake cycle and relate neurological abnormalities. Lectures will discuss major classes of drugs used to mitigate and treat these disorder, their mechanisms of action, clinical use and unwanted effects. This course was previously offered as PCL475Y1. 

  • Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9.0 FCE
  • Exclusion: PCL475Y1; PSY396H1

PCL476H1

Dr. WM Burnham

Neuropsychopharmacology II (36L, 12T)

Students will explore the major CNS neurological syndromes which may include anxiety, schizophrenia and depression/mania and their relate neurological abnormalities. Lectures will discuss major classes of drugs used to mitigate and treat these disorders, their mechanisms of action, clinical use and unwanted effects.

  • Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9.0 FCE
  • Exclusion: PCL475Y1; PSY396H1

PCL477H1

Dr. Peter McPherson

The DNA Damage Response in Pharmacology and Toxicology (24L)

Many anticancer drugs and environmental agents exert their cytotoxic effects through DNA damage. This course explores specific pharmacological and toxicological agents that damage DNA and discusses how mammalian cells respond to this DNA damage.

  • Prerequisite: BCH210H1/ BCH242Y1

PCL481H1

Dr. Denis Grant

The Molecular and Biochemical Basis of Toxicology (24L)

The biochemical principles and molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of drugs and foreign agents. The sequence of events at the molecular level leading to impairment of cell function and the factors which determine and affect toxicity.

  • Prerequisite: PCL302H1
  • Recommended Preparation: PCL362H1, BCH210H1/ BCH242Y1

PCL482H1
(previously PCL473Y1)

Dr. Peter McPherson

Biomedical Toxicology (24L)

This course explores several contemporary topics in biomedical toxicology with emphasis on how chemicals affect human health. Lectures cover principles of toxicology, the mechanisms of toxicity of a wide variety of toxic agents and the associated toxicities, methodologies used to examine chemical toxicities, risk assessment, and the applications of toxicology.

  • Prerequisite: ( PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL362H1) or Permission of the Course Coordinator
  • Exclusion: PCL473Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1 + BCH311H1

PCL483H1
(previously PCL473Y1)

Dr. Peter McPherson

Interdisciplinary Toxicology (24L)

This course explores several contemporary topics in biomedical and environmental toxicology with emphasis on how chemicals affect human health. Lectures cover principles of toxicology, the mechanisms of toxicity of a wide variety of toxic agents and the associated toxicities, methodologies used to examine chemical toxicities, risk assessment, and the applications of toxicology.

  • Prerequisite: ( PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL362H1) or Permission of the Course Coordinator
  • Exclusion: PCL473Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1 + BCH311H1

PCL486H1

Dr. Leonardo Salmena

Pharmacology of Cancer Signaling (24L)

This course will expand on both classical and cutting edge pharmacological strategies proposed to mitigate the consequences of altered signal transduction in cancer. Students will have the opportunity to develop knowledge on these molecular events and how they can be targeted to improve clinical outcomes. Students will integrate lecture material with assigned readings and assignments.

  • Prerequisite: PCL302H1
  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1/ BCH242Y1

PCL490H1

undergrad.pharmtox@utoronto.ca

Advanced Topics in Pharmacology and Toxicology (12L, 12S)

An opportunity to expand on innovative and unique topics in Pharmacology and Toxicology that are not already extensively addressed. The course will reveal the dynamic nature of the field and the diverse interests of our faculty. Students will be introduced to leading edge topics and research within the discipline of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

  • Prerequisite: PCL302H1, and one of STA288H1/ STA220H1/ PCL376H1
  • Recommended Preparation: PCL469H1/ PCL470H1/ PCL482H1/ PCL483H1

Winter 2020: ‘Drugs, Poisons, and Public Policy: The Role of Pharmacology &Toxicology in Policy-Making’
Coordinator: Dr. Gloria Rachamin

This course will discuss the policy making process and the application of pharmacology and toxicology to the development of evidence-based policies to protect human health from exposure to drugs and chemicals, such as cannabis, opioids, carcinogens and pesticides. It will also discuss various other factors (e.g., fiscal, political) that influence policy decisions, and the importance of effective science communication. The course intends to bridge the gap between science and policy, and enhance science-based policy making and communication.

JPM300H1

Dr. Michelle Arnot

Research Readiness and Advancing Biomedical Discoveries (12L, 24T)

Explore how scientists leverage their knowledge and skills to advance academic biomedical discoveries from the laboratory to improve patient health through either commercialization or not-for-profit approaches. Students will learn about innovation and develop key research and industry skills including intellectual property, ethics, budget and project management; learn how to critically evaluate scientific evidence and effectively communicate to a wide audience. This hybrid student-centered course will include interactive online modules and in-class group work. Course work will focus on developing skills and knowledge to help you be successful in diverse research courses and future careers. Not eligible for CR/NCR.

  • Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE completed; BCH210H1/ BCH242Y1
  • Recommended Preparation: PSL300H1, PSL301H1

JPM400H1

undergrad.pharmtox@utoronto.ca

Biomedical Incubator Capstone Project (240P, 16S)

Discover what it is like to be part of a biomedical innovation team. Develop and engage in biomedical research in a simulated small business/incubator setting under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Bring your proposed JPM300H1 project to life, while acquiring budget management, research, business and communication workplace skills for future careers. Enrolment is application-based. Proposals will be reviewed by committee and successful proposals will be matched to a mentor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Students will form teams and develop a research proposal based on either:

  1. Faculty led concept requiring further development and testing, which would not normally be funded grants and would be tangential to ongoing research in the lab.
  2. Student developed innovative idea that requires further development and testing. This should be a project that is not being investigated in a UofT research lab.
  • Prerequisite: A minimum of 75% in JPM300H1; completion of any of PCL367H1/ PCL368H1/ PSL372H1/ BCH370H1/ BCH377H1. Application required; see department for more information.